Hockey

Preparing for Hockey Tryouts

Tryout season can be almost as stressful as the regular season. Players are jockeying for positions,  coaches are searching for the right players to fill their squad and parents are trying to understand what would be best for their son or daughter. Leading up to tryouts, there are things players can do to make sure they are as prepared as possible for a good showing when the time comes.

Preparing to Compete

As we head into playoff season, it is important to remember that proper preparation, on a daily basis is a major factor to your success. Preparing for a game doesn’t start when you step on the ice. Preparation is really a daily process of repeating certain things that make you the player you are. Preparation starts with how you eat and sleep at home or on the road. I try to engrain in all of the players we work with that preparation begins when you walk in the door of the rink. At this time, the game and what you need to do to win need to be the only thing on your mind.

2 Simple Exercises to Skate Faster

Speed on the ice is defined by stride length times stride frequency. In order to improve your speed, you must improve one of these two factors. Improving strength and power in the lower body will aid in the improvement of frequency and is a very important aspect of off ice training. This improvement however may take some time. One simple and quicker way is to improve your stride length by increasing your 

High Ankle Sprains in Hockey

Ankle sprains are the most common injury seen in sports. Typically, the ligaments on the lateral or outside part of the ankle are affected. In hockey, the stiffness of the skate helps protect these ligaments, but the force can be translated up above the ankle joint resulting in a high ankle sprain. The tibiofibular ligament and interosseous membrane hold the two shin bones together and are located above the ankle joint. These two structures are at a higher risk of injury in the hockey player. The injury can occur when 

The Importance of In Season Training in Hockey

The grind of a hockey season can take a toll on a player’s body. There can be upwards of 50-60 games plus two to three practices a week and private training during a season that can run from August until USA Hockey Nationals in April. This grind can break down the muscles in the body leading to decreased performance and possible acute or overuse injuries. A common oversight is to either stop “Dryland” training during the season or to train the wrong systems leading to more breakdowns in the body. 

Knee MCL Injuries in Hockey

The medial collateral ligament in the knee or MCL was the second most common injury in NCAA hockey in 2013 as stated by Grant, Bedi, Kurz, Bancroft & Miller. The study showed that only concussions had a higher injury rate in male collegiate players. The MCL is one of four ligaments in the knee and is located on the inside or medial portion of the knee connecting the femur and tibia. The ligaments purpose is to provide support to the inside of the knee helping 

The medial collateral ligament in the knee or MCL was the second most common injury in NCAA hockey in 2013 as stated by Grant, Bedi, Kurz, Bancroft & Miller. The study showed that only concussions had a higher injury rate in male collegiate players. The MCL is one of four ligaments in the knee and is located on the inside or medial portion of the knee connecting the femur and tibia. The ligaments purpose is to provide support to the inside of the knee helping 

Hockey Nutrition

Hockey Nutrition: The Right Meals To Help Your Game

Checking the fridge first thing in the morning is not uncommon. Sadly, nothing seems appealing, so you decide you will skip breakfast and feast come dinner hour.

Groin Injuries in Hockey

Groin strains are common injuries in the game of ice hockey. Previous reports in the NHL have shown than up to 10% of all injuries sustained have been due to strains of the groin or adductor muscle group. In today’s NHL, it is a little tougher to note since these injuries are now classified as “lower body” and not specific. The main groin muscles include the adductor longus, magnus and brevis and the gracilis. Their primary function is to bring the leg back towards the middle of the body or adduct the hip. Groin injuries can be debilitating as the muscle group is elongated on the skating stride and contracted on the recovery phase, so it is constantly being stressed. Strains of this nature can cause 

Off Season Goals for Hockey Players

For most hockey players, the season has ended. It’s time to get a little rest and let the body and mind recover. The season can be a grind with lots of games, practices, lessons and travel and taking some time away from the ice can do a ton of good. For teenage hockey players, I suggest a two to four week break. This may be tough depending on tryouts, showcases, etc, but 

Heiden Jumps to Improve Power in Hockey

Power can be defined as the rate at which work can be done. Simply put, how fast can you move an object? That object could be the puck being blasted into the top shelf, an opponent getting checked while skating down the wing or your own body skating across the ice. In today’s game, power is 

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