Hockey

Common Hockey Injuries and How to Prevent Them

In a high velocity, contact sport such as ice hockey, injuries are bound to occur. NHL players can reach speeds of over 20 mph on the ice and a puck can be shot at over 100 mph. With players ranging in size, the amount of force created in a check or simply skating or shooting can cause injuries. Injuries range from sprained ligaments and strained muscles to contusions (bruises), broken bones and concussions. 

Building a Stronger and More Stable Hockey Player

We often see social media posts of athletes lifting massive weights in an attempt to get bigger muscles. Many young hockey players see these posts and want to do the same – get huge muscles because they think it will make them better hockey players. Well unfortunately, that’s not necessarily true. Today’s hockey player needs to be quick, agile, and stable enough to ward off a defender in order to be successful. Getting “hockey strong” doesn’t have to mean getting huge muscles, it means getting stronger in order to be a better player. Isn’t that the goal of off ice training, to become a better player on the ice?

Training in Rotation

In most sports, you will notice some form of rotational component.  This applies to activities of everyday life, as well.  Whether it’s jumping in figure skating, pitching a baseball, shooting a hockey puck, or kicking a soccer ball, you are rotating to some degree.  Which is why it is important to train your core in rotation and anti-rotation movements, regardless of your sport. 

Treating Lace Bite in Skaters

Lace bite can be a debilitating condition affecting both hockey players and figure skaters. The condition is an irritation in the front of the ankle that can affect the skin and tendons. The cause of lace bite is pressure placed on the anterior ankle from either the skate laces or the tongue of the boot. This pressure is increased during skating 

Eating Whole Foods

You have probably heard the recommendation to eat “mostly whole foods” for your health.

But what does it mean to "eat mostly whole foods"?  What are whole foods?  And why are they better for your health?

The Potato Debate

Sweet potatoes vs. potatoes: A nutritional debate fueled by misinformation, baseless ‘superfood’ obsessions, and carbohydrate phobias. Here’s how these tubers compare — and why both deserve a place in your diet.

Mentally Preparing for Return To Play

COVID-19 has led to a worldwide disruption of the sporting industry and has altered many athletes’ demeanors, attitudes, control, and confidence. Has COVID-19 put you in a mental rut? Are you nervous to get back onto the field/court or feel as though this disease has threatened a pillar of your identity?

Preventing Heat Illness

As California sports are allowed to return to practice, it is critical to be aware of the risks of exertional heat illness.  Extended heat exposure, lack of hydration, and high exertion in hot and/or humid conditions can result in life-threatening conditions.  Here are a few tips to beat the heat.

Meal Planning

So you live at a health spa with your own personal chef. You lucky duck, you.  For everyone else… eating well isn’t a freebie. It doesn't happen by accident. It requires a plan.  Eating well is a daily challenge. You have to make it happen with a little anticipation and planning ahead.

Training After a Growth Spurt

As we watch our kids grow up, we see varying stages of their development that excite us. We see them get taller, their feet and hands grow, and they get stronger. With this development, we as parents expect more from our kids. What we tend to forget is that as they physically grow, it takes time for the rest of their bodies to catch up.  With the recent months of reduced activity and more sleep, many parents have seen their kids go through major growth spurts.  So what are we as parents, coaches, and athletic trainers to do?

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